In this Category

18.12.2013 06.51 GMT+0000

...

Growing Consumer Consciousness About Retirement

No Image
In the world of “entitlement” programs, the youngest Boomers just turning 50-years-old this year believe that social security will not be available for them nor will Medicare as we know it. While it would be nice to have research to support this, suffice it to say, survey 50-somethings and they’ll confirm this statement! Many Boomers rarely have the opportunity to work for the same employer long enough to accrue some benefits into retirement...

03.12.2013 08.00 GMT+0000

...

Pension To 401(k) Challenges Similar to Current Healthcare Crisis

No Image
Buying health care insurance in the U.S. is confusing, with different insurance carriers, a dizzying array of different types of coverage and a variety of ways that employees paid for a portion of their costs (such as deductibles, copayments, and out-of-pocket maximums). With the rollout of Obamacare, newspapers and blogs are full of discussions about how confusing the choices are and how difficult it is to select a plan. Well, the truth is that buying health insurance has been confusing for many years, but employers sheltered employees (and, in many cases, retirees) from this confusing mess...

23.07.2013 04.38 GMT+0000

...

Use The Brain, Retire Later

No Image
Research coming out of the Alzheimer's Association International Conference in Boston last week is showing evidence that mature adults who stay engaged with work activity that promotes brain power and mental acuity have less risk of developing Alzheimer's disease or other dementia. The study included 429,000 workers' records in France where some of the best worldwide research on Alzheimer's is coming from (due to a governmental focus on the disorder). Researchers in the U.S. concur with the study results (the largest to date) and say that working keeps anyone active. There is physical engagement...

28.06.2013 06.13 GMT+0000

...

Where Should You Retire?

No Image
A recent study showed a state-by-state analysis of the best locations for adults 65 and older to settle down. The healthiest state for seniors was Minnesota followed by Vermont, New Hampshire, Massachusetts and Iowa. At the bottom of the list as the unhealthiest state was Mississippi with Oklahoma, Louisiana, West Virginia and Arkansas also at the bottom of the rankings. What factors contributed to a state’s healthiness for retirees? The researchers scored 34 measures of senior health; among them...

12.06.2013 06.00 GMT+0000

...

Retirement Is Not The End Of The World

No Image
Retirement for many is not what it’s cracked up to be. After awhile experiencing the golden years becomes more a chore than a relaxation. Many retirees are seeking jobs to get back into the workplace. At the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, a new retiree rehire policy recently took effect. The human resources department has many new rules and regulations about how to rehire a former University of Illinois employee out of retirement...

05.06.2013 07.10 GMT+0000

...

The Transition To Retirement

No Image
Every day, 10,000 people turn 60-years-old, and there are more enrolling in Medicare when reaching 65-years-old. That magic age of 65, 67 or even 70-years-old has been burned into our heads since youth. It’s the age of retirement…the golden years when life is easy and time for relaxation is on our hands. Because there are so many Boomers heading into “retirement,” there is also more research about what happens shortly thereafter. Encore.Org...

22.05.2013 04.09 GMT+0000

...

Understanding The Albatross of Retiree Health Costs

No Image
It used to be that when retirees were fortunate to have had lengthy service in corporate America, there was often a small pot at the end of the rainbow to pay for healthcare in retirement. Or retiree health insurance could be paid for with a pension. Today? Not so much. Those fast approaching retirement age, 64-years-old, need to address the albatross of retiree health costs directly and lighten the load. The annual Fidelity study of health costs estimates, "that a couple retiring at 65 will need $240,000 to cover health costs in retirement."...